I am in the process of re-designing our offensive playbook. I am going through each section and will be cleaning things up, adding new things and just generally making things better. As I go through this process, I want to discuss all of the different pieces of the playbook and different ways to think about your offense.

One of the first parts of almost any playbook is the Philosophy section. Even thought these typically come at the beginning of a playbook, and should set the tone for the rest of the offense, they are often overlooked and feel tacked on. In my opinion, that is a big mistake. This part of your playbook sets the tone and lays out the road map of your team’s success.

Offensive Philosophy

When you first sit down to review or develop your playbook, you most likely already have a personal offensive philosophy. You know how you want to run your offense, what overall scheme, what tempo, run more, pass more, balanced, etc. Your personal philosophy is obviously important, but it means very little if you can not explain it clearly and concisely to your coaches and players.

I am a no huddle coach. I know going in that one thing we will do is to play fast! I firmly believe that it gives us a decided advantage in the run game. We have always been undersized on the OL and that is something that affects a lot of teams. If we were to try and line up and huddle in the traditional sense, we would run into some problems. I saw this during games. At the beginning of drives, we would be unable to run the ball effectively. If we managed to get a first down in the same drive, our ability to run the ball increased tremendously. Does that mean you should run the no huddle? Absolutely not! But that is part of the reason I have the philosophy I do.

Now, we have established one small part of my philosophy, but it is not nearly enough to be considered complete. All we know so far is that we will call plays quickly. What plays? What formations? What will we hang our hat on? What will define us? Here is a slide of the philosophy I gave to our kids last season.

Offensive Philosophy

After looking at it now, it has very little information on there. This does not direct our team as to what kind of offense we are going to be. It tells our team that we will use multiple tempos and why we are doing that, but it doesn’t tell them our identity. There is no definitive statement saying telling our team that this is who we are. This needs to be completely rewritten from the ground up!

This is the new version that I will be using next year. It more clearly defines what we want to do as an offense, why we want to do it and how we will accomplish it.

2016 Offensive Philosophy

Now, when you are creating your philosophy, you can borrow from other teams, coaches and playbooks as to how you will word it. BUT, it MUST be what you believe and what you want to accomplish or the kids will not believe it and buy into it.

Hopefully this gives you some good ideas as you decide how to best present your vision to your coaches and players next season!

I am in the process of re-designing our offensive playbook. I am going through each section and will be cleaning things up, adding new things and just generally making things better. As I go through this process, I want to discuss all of the different pieces of the playbook and different ways to think about your offense.

One of the first parts of almost any playbook is the Philosophy section. Even thought these typically come at the beginning of a playbook, and should set the tone for the rest of the offense, they are often overlooked and feel tacked on. In my opinion, that is a big mistake. This part of your playbook sets the tone and lays out the road map of your team’s success.

Offensive Philosophy

When you first sit down to review or develop your playbook, you most likely already have a personal offensive philosophy. You know how you want to run your offense, what overall scheme, what tempo, run more, pass more, balanced, etc. Your personal philosophy is obviously important, but it means very little if you can not explain it clearly and concisely to your coaches and players.

I am a no huddle coach. I know going in that one thing we will do is to play fast! I firmly believe that it gives us a decided advantage in the run game. We have always been undersized on the OL and that is something that affects a lot of teams. If we were to try and line up and huddle in the traditional sense, we would run into some problems. I saw this during games. At the beginning of drives, we would be unable to run the ball effectively. If we managed to get a first down in the same drive, our ability to run the ball increased tremendously. Does that mean you should run the no huddle? Absolutely not! But that is part of the reason I have the philosophy I do.

Now, we have established one small part of my philosophy, but it is not nearly enough to be considered complete. All we know so far is that we will call plays quickly. What plays? What formations? What will we hang our hat on? What will define us? Here is a slide of the philosophy I gave to our kids last season.

Offensive Philosophy

After looking at it now, it has very little information on there. This does not direct our team as to what kind of offense we are going to be. It tells our team that we will use multiple tempos and why we are doing that, but it doesn’t tell them our identity. There is no definitive statement saying telling our team that this is who we are. This needs to be completely rewritten from the ground up!

This is the new version that I will be using next year. It more clearly defines what we want to do as an offense, why we want to do it and how we will accomplish it.

2016 Offensive Philosophy

Now, when you are creating your philosophy, you can borrow from other teams, coaches and playbooks as to how you will word it. BUT, it MUST be what you believe and what you want to accomplish or the kids will not believe it and buy into it.

Hopefully this gives you some good ideas as you decide how to best present your vision to your coaches and players next season!